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Posts for: March, 2019

By DR. HUMAIRA SYED
March 11, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Foot Surgery  

Do you need foot surgery? Do you worry that the procedure may be invasive, painful, or limiting of your daily routines? At REDS Ankle and surgeryFoot Associates in Wayne, Clifton, and Fort Lee, New Jersey, your foot and ankle surgeon, Dr. Humaira Syed is board-qualified in podiatric procedures, including surgery. While conservative treatments are tried first, sometimes the lower extremities need corrective surgery to look, feel, and function normally. You can trust Dr. Syed's expertise to put you on the right path to wellness.

Evaluating Someone for Surgery

When simpler measures such as splinting, rest, analgesics, shoe orthotics, and more cannot help a podiatric problem, Dr. Syed may recommend in-office or outpatient surgery performed with benefit of local or general anesthesia.

Before scheduling an operation, your Wayne, NJ, foot and ankle surgeon will examine your foot and watch you walk. Podiatrists call this gait analysis, and it helps the doctor determine what stresses are placed on your foot and where and how your medical condition is impacting your movement and level of comfort.

In addition, Dr. Syed will carefully review your medical and medication history. She may order lab work and other diagnostic studies, including digital X-rays and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. From there, she'll formulate your treatment plan, including pre-operative preparations and post-operative care.

Types of Podiatric Surgeries

Today's podiatrist offers a wide range of surgeries, which correct deformities, relieve pain, and normalize function. Some of the most common foot and ankle operations include:

  • Bunionectomy, which removes a pronounced bump at the base of the big toe and re-aligns the metatarsophalangeal joint
  • Tendon surgery, to shorten or straighten connective tissue for conditions such as Achilles Tendonitis
  • Fusion of the foot or ankle, which places stabilizing hardware such as screws and plates after someone has suffered a severe fracture or sprain of the foot or ankle
  • Plantar fasciitis surgery, which releases a tight band of connective tissue which runs across the bottom of the foot (sometimes involves removal of a co-existing heel spur)
  • Matrixectomy or partial removal of the toenail when deformity or disease warrants
  • Removal of common benign tumors--called neuromas--in the ball of the foot
  • Metatarsal surgery, to correct deformities of the foot bones behind the toes (except for the big toe)

Count on Compassionate Accurate Care

With surgery from Dr. Syed, you'll feel better and be back to your usual routine quickly. If you suspect that you have a podiatric medical problem, please call one of our offices at (973) 692-1111 for a consultation. REDS Ankle and Foot Associates has an office in Wayne, Clifton and Fort Lee, NJ.


By DR. HUMAIRA SYED
March 06, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Is heel pain keeping you down? Pain that occurs following an injury or early in an illness may play a protective role, warning us about the damage we have suffered. SoYour Heel Pain Could Be Plantar Fasciitis what causes heel pain?
 
Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition in which a band of tissue in the sole of the foot becomes inflamed, leading to severe heel pain. The pain can be so bad that it hurts to walk, much less exercise or perform daily activities. If one step causes shooting pain in your heel—especially when you first get out of bed in the morning or stand up after sitting for a long period of time—plantar fasciitis may be to blame. Contact your podiatrist immediately for proper diagnosis and treatment of your pain. 
 

Understanding Heel Pain with Help from Your Podiatrist

Plantar fasciitis, or heel pain, occurs when the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension. This causes the soft tissue fibers of the fascia to tear or stretch at points along its length, leading to inflammation, pain and possibly the growth of a bone spur where it attaches to the heel bone.
 
Inflammation may become irritated by shoes that lack appropriate support, mainly in the arch area and by the constant irritation associated with an athletic lifestyle. Resting may provide temporary relief, but when you resume walking you may experience a sudden elongation of the fascia band, which stretches and pulls on the heel. As you walk the pain may lessen or even disappear, but that may just be a false sense of relief, as the pain will often return after prolonged rest or extensive walking.  
 
You can take steps now to avoid heel pain, including:
  • Wear shoes that fit well
  • Wear proper shoes for each activity
  • Do not wear shoes with excessive wear on heels or soles
  • Prepare properly before exercising by stretching and warming up
  • Pace yourself when you participate in athletic activities
  • Don’t underestimate your body’s need for rest and good nutrition
  • Lose excess weight
If pain and other symptoms of inflammation persist, you should limit your normal daily activities and contact your podiatrist immediately.